Singapore General Elections 2020: Party manifestos

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The party logos for PAP, PSP and WP.

With 93, 24 and 21 candidates respectively,[1] the People’s Action Party (PAP), Progress Singapore Party (PSP) and Workers’ Party (WP) are the largest contenders in the 2020 Singapore General Elections. This entry compiles the manifestos for their election campaigns and the policies that each party has proposed.

People’s Action Party (PAP)[edit | edit source]

The PAP launched their 23-page manifesto on 27 June 2020.[2][3] PAP’s slogan for the 2020 General Elections is “Our Lives, Our Jobs, Our Future”.

The cover page of the PAP manifesto.

Manifesto proposals[edit | edit source]

The following is a non-exhaustive list of the proposals put forward by the PAP:[4]

1. Goods and Services Tax (GST) 9% hike from 2022.
2. Add 200 hectares of nature parks by 2025.
3. Public healthcare subsidies of up to 80%.
4. Double Ministry of Education (MOE) kindergartens to 60.
5. Secondary school students to receive digital devices by 2021.
6. Free gym and pool entry for seniors (65 years old and above).
7. 32 polyclinics by 2030.
8. Double rail networks - Cross Island Line, Thomson-East Coast Line.

Read the PAP manifesto in full here.

Reactions to proposals[edit | edit source]

In an article published by The Straits Times on 30 June 2020, a National University of Singapore (NUS) political science professor, Bilveer Singh commented on PAP’s policies.[5] He observes that the PAP has presented “policies which are largely popular and populist (during the pandemic), even though they are presented as essentials to help the country”.[6]

Progress Singapore Party (PSP)[edit | edit source]

The PSP launched their 13-page political manifesto on 29 June 2020.[7] PSP’s slogan for the 2020 General Elections is “You Deserve Better”.

The cover page of the PSP manifesto.

Manifesto proposals[edit | edit source]

The following is a non-exhaustive list of the proposals put forward by the PSP:[8]

1. 0% Goods and Services Tax (GST) for necessities.
2. Cut minister salaries.
3. Citizens get priority for jobs.
4. 5-year freeze on tax and fee increases.
5. Cheaper Housing Development Board (HDB) flats for young Singaporeans.
6. Age 55 access to CPF with up to S$50,000 withdrawal.
7. Review the Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation (POFMA) bill and encourage free speech.
8. Government to pay Medishield Life premium.

Read the PSP manifesto in full here.

Workers’ Party (WP)[edit | edit source]

The WP launched their 39-page political manifesto on 28 June 2020.[9] Gerald Giam, He Ting Ru, Leon Perera and Daniel Goh contributed to the writing of the manifesto. WP’s slogan for the 2020 General Elections is “Make Your Vote Count”.

The cover page of the WP manifesto.

Manifesto proposals[edit | edit source]

The following is a non-exhaustive list of the proposals put forward by the WP:[10][11]

1. Oppose the Goods and Services Tax (GST) 9% hike.
2. Lower the voting age from 21 to 18 years old.
3. Free COVID-19 vaccines for all.
4. 24 weeks of paid parental leave. Minimum 4 weeks for fathers.
5. Age 60 access to CPF Payouts & CPF Life.
6. Free public transport for seniors (65 years old and above) and Singaporeans with disabilities.
7. 20-student class in all schools.
8. Target 10% sustainable energy by 2025.
9. Minimum take-home wage of S$1,300 for full-time workers.

Read the WP manifesto in full here.

Reactions to proposals[edit | edit source]

In an article published by South China Morning Post, Woo Jun Jie, a political analyst,[12] commented on the WP proposals that directly challenged the PAP such as opposing the GST hike and lowering the voting age in Singapore. He says:

“... taking such a position can help them win votes from those who may be unhappy with the PAP, whether because of these policies or others.”[13]

NUS associate professor, Bilveer Singh[14] noted that the challenge demonstrated the opposition’s “maturity” and would “force the PAP to defend – and better – its policies”.[15]

Additional resources[edit | edit source]

References/ Citations[edit | edit source]

  1. "Singapore General Elections 2020: Constituency candidates". Wiki.sg. Accessed on 3 July 2020.
  2. Aqil Haziq Mahmud. “GE2020: PAP launches manifesto focusing on jobs, economy and keeping lives safe amid COVID-19 pandemic”. Channel News Asia. June 27, 2020. Accessed on 2 July 2020.
  3. Phua, Rachel and Aqil Haziq Mahmud. “GE2020: 6 key strategies in PAP’s latest election manifesto”. Channel News Asia. June 27, 2020. Accessed on 2 July 2020.
  4. Lee, Jeremy. “PM Lee Reveals Veteran MP Charles Chong Is Retiring During PAP Manifesto Broadcast”. MustShare News. June 27, 2020. Accessed on 2 July 2020.
  5. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR BILVEER SINGH”. National University of Singapore Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Accessed on 2 July 2020.
  6. Aw Cheng Wei. “Singapore GE2020: Opposition parties more cautious this election, say analysts”. The Straits Times. June 30, 2020. Accessed on 2 July 2020.
  7. Koh, Fabian. “Singapore GE2020: Key proposals from the Progress Singapore Party manifesto”. The Straits Times. June 29, 2020. Accessed on 2 July 2020.
  8. Yee, Jonathan. “PSP Manifesto Calls For Cutting Ministerial Salaries, Freezing Tax Increases For Next 5 Years”. MustShare News. June 29, 2020. Accessed on 2 July 2020.
  9. Chew Hui Min. “GE2020: Workers’ Party launches manifesto with proposals for post-COVID world”. The Straits Times. June 28, 2020. Accessed on 1 July 2020.
  10. Workers’ Party Unveils Manifesto, Proposes Lowering Voting Age To 18”. MustShare News. June 28, 2020. Accessed on 2 July 2020.
  11. Bloomberg. “Singapore election: Workers’ Party manifesto targets high cost of living”. South China Morning Post. June 28, 2020. Accessed on 2 July 2020.
  12. Jun Jie Woo”. Harvard Kennedy School. Accessed on 2 July 2020.
  13. Sim, Dewey. “Singapore election: opposition parties pull no punches in opposing PAP”. South China Morning Post. June 28, 2020. Accessed on 2 July 2020.
  14. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR BILVEER SINGH”. National University of Singapore Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Accessed on 2 July 2020.
  15. Sim, Dewey. “Singapore election: opposition parties pull no punches in opposing PAP”. South China Morning Post. June 28, 2020. Accessed on 2 July 2020.