Brian Richmond

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Brian Richmond
Brian-Richmond.jpg
Born
Brian Peter Richmond

7 September 1947
EducationSt Patrick's School
Years active1971 - present day
Spouse(s)Susanne Ong
ChildrenMark Richmond, Don Richmond

With a career spanning more than four decades, Brian Richmond is regarded as a veteran radio presenter, host and sports commentator in Singapore. As of September 2019, he is a weekend radio presenter at Gold 90.5 FM.

Personal life

Brian Richmond and his wife Susanne Ong. Photo from Toggle.

Childhood

Brian Peter Richmond was born on 7 September 1947 to an English father and a Eurasian mother.[1] His father worked with the British Army and his mother was a secretary.[2] Following his parents’ divorce, his mother took custody of him.[3]


Between the age of two and four, Brian was picked up by a Malay man named Wahid who happened to know his mother.[4][5] Wahid invited Brian to stay with his family in Telok Kurau. Brian took up the invitation and refused to return home when his mother came to pick him up. From then on, the Wahids became Brian’s foster family and were paid a monthly fee for taking care of him. Brian’s primary caretaker was Wahid’s mother, who he had called “auntie”.[6]


At nine years old, Brian was sent to live at the boarding house of St Patrick’s School along East Coast Road for “a good Catholic upbringing”. However, he continued to spend his school holidays with his foster family. Brian did not complete his secondary school education. Midway through Secondary Four, Wahid passed away. Following the news, Brian left boarding school and stayed home to keep “auntie” company.[7] Brian completed his ‘A’ Levels at St Thomas School, a private institution.[8]

Marriage

Brian first met his wife, Susanne Ong, at a sarabat stall - a mini-coffeeshop - in Queenstown. According to a 2007 interview, Brian had noticed “this girl coming back from school, from River Valley Chinese Government Middle School” and wearing “this white-framed glasses”. While he had initially accompanied his friend to meet her, Ong eventually “fell for (him) more than (his friend)”. Brian and Sussane started dating when they were 15 and 14 years old respectively.[9]


Brian proposed to Sussane on her 21st birthday party that he had organised. They were married a year later.[10] They have two sons together, Mark and Don Richmond.

Background

During his youth, Brian was an avid sportsman. He reportedly started playing football at 11 years old and represented St Patrick's School in hockey and football. At 15 years old, he played as full back on the St Patrick's football team. His hockey team won the school championships in 1963.[11] Brian's early interest in sports paved the way for his future stint as a sports commentator.

National youth athlete

Brian Richmond (first row, far left) representing Singapore at an international tournament. Photo from All Singapore Stuff.

At 16 years old, Brian played for Singapore’s national youth football team after passing the selection trials in 1964. He represented Singapore in various tournaments including the King’s Cup tournament in Bangkok in 1968.[12]


In 1970, Brian fractured his right ankle during a local Division 1 game. His sporting career came to an abrupt end. Following the injury, Brian had a stint as the coach for the national youth team in 1973. Brian switched to sports commentary after the Football Association of Singapore was declared bankrupt.[13][14]

Career highlights

Brian Richmond presently hosts "The Vintage Showcase with Brian Richmond" show on Gold 90.5 FM.

In the 1970s, Brian Richmond was juggling freelance gigs in radio and television while deejaying on the side. On top of these part-time jobs, Brian held a full-time position at an advertising firm. In the mid-1980s, he started up BR Productions, a company that made corporate videos. Brian liquidated the business in 2014.[15]

Radio (1971 - Present day)

In 1970, Brian answered an advertisement by Radio Television Singapore (RTS) for radio announcers. However, he had failed the audition at the time. With encouragement from his wife, Brian auditioned again the following year. He was successful this time around and began his radio career at Rediffusion in 1971.[16]

Years active Show segment Radio station
1998 - present day The Vintage Showcase[17] Gold 90.5 FM
Gold Breakfast Show with Brian and Mark Richmond[18] Gold 90.5 FM
Homestretch with Brian and Mark Richmond[19] Gold 90.5 FM
Vintage Sundays[20] Gold 90.5 FM
Gold Afternoons[21] Gold 90.5 FM
Sundays with Brian[22] Gold 90.5 FM
Pioneer Country Show[23] Gold 90.5 FM
Breakfast with Brian[24] Gold 90.5 FM
Let’s Go Country on Sundays[25] Gold 90.5 FM
1988 - 1998 Dunhill Music Magazine[26] Radio 1
Teen Rendezvous[27] Radio 1
Clean and Bright[28] Radio 1
The Good Times[29] Radio 1
Sunday Special[30] Radio 1
1971 - late 1980s Good Music, Company and Me[31] Rediffusion
Pop Around[32] Rediffusion

TV sports commentator (1971)

Brian’s career as a sports commentator began in 1971 when he was assigned to cover the Southeast Asian Peninsular (SEAP) games. At the time, he anchored the live reports in Kuala Lumpur every night for two weeks. Subsequently, Brian was invited to present the weekly sports show with Fong Hoe Beng until 1974. The pair hosted the 1974 World Cup Finals which marked Singapore’s first colour programme.[33][34][35] In the 1970s, Brian also commentated for the Malaysia Cup football matches.[36]

Richmond Connection (1972)

Brian Richmond pictured in 1976. Photo from The Straits Times (Singapore Press Holdings).

In 1972, Brian set-up a mobile disco company called ‘Richmond Connection’.[37] Brian started freelancing as a DJ at The Boiler Room at Mandarin Hotel before moving to Lost Horizon at the Shangri-La Hotel in 1974.[38] Over the years, he has deejayed at various nightspots like The West End Club at Goodwood Park Hotel, Studio M, Club 5, Hearthrob and Connexions at King’s Hotel.[39][40]

Hosting (Events & Television)

Brian Richmond (right) hosting the 1978 Talentime television programme. Photo from Toggle.

Brian has acted as a Master of Ceremonies at various functions, events and concerts, most of which are music-related.

Year Event / Television programme
2017 Rocking Good Times[41]
2015 Stars of the Golden Venus[42]
2012 All Time Favourites[43]
2012 Down Memory Lane 5[44]
2009 Golden Memories Christmas Concert[45]
2009 Down Memory Lane IV[46]
2009 Eurasiana: A Musical Tribute[47]
2008 Song Stories 1: Heroes in Concert[48]
2007 My Life - Michael Issac Tribute[49]
2005 Asia Pacific Country Rock ‘N’ Roll Charity Music Festival[50]
2004 Rolling Good Times[51]
2004 Down Memory Lane III[52]
2003 Bringing On Back The Good Times[53]
2002 Down Memory Lane II[54]
2001 Country Jamboree Cruise[55]
2000 Down Memory Lane[56]
1997 The Elvis Dance Party[57]
1993 Eurasian Extravaganza[58]
1990 Wishing Singapore Well[59]
1986 Miss Universe - Semi-final Show[60]
1985 Countdown ‘86[61]
1978 Talentime television series[62]
1978 Telefun[63]

Media appearances

Brian Richmond was featured in the opening scene of Singapore's 2019 NDP music video. Screengrab from YouTube video.
Year Event Role
2019 National Day Music Video Performer
2017 National Day Parade Performer
2004 President’s Star Charity[64] Performer
2001 The Necessary Stage - “Lovewave 96.6”[65] Stage debut

Awards & accolades

In 2005, Brian Richmond was awarded the 'Lifetime Achievement Award' at the Singapore Radio Awards for his 34 years in the radio industry.[66]

Year Event Title Awarding Organisation
2011 75 Years of Radio Gala Dinner Diamond Award[67] -
2010 Singapore Radio Awards Most Popular Radio Personality[68] Mediacorp
2007 Singapore Radio Awards[69] Most Popular Radio Personality


Carlsberg Friendliest Radio Personality

Mediacorp
2005 Singapore Radio Awards Lifetime Achievement Award[70] Mediacorp

References / Citations

  1. “School Days - Brian Richmond”. Toggle. December 11, 2017. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from toggle.sg.
  2. Our City, Our Home: Eurasians 1965-2015. Singapore: Eurasian Association, 2015.
  3. Leong, Sandra. “Love is in the air”. The Straits Times. November 21, 2005. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  4. Our City, Our Home: Eurasians 1965-2015. Singapore: Eurasian Association, 2015.
  5. “School Days - Brian Richmond”. Toggle. December 11, 2017. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from toggle.sg.
  6. “School Days - Brian Richmond”. Toggle. December 11, 2017. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from toggle.sg.
  7. “School Days - Brian Richmond”. Toggle. December 11, 2017. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from toggle.sg.
  8. Judith Helmberg. “Brian, grand-daddy of sports talk”. New Nation. July 20, 1981. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  9. Richmond, Brian. “Special project”. National Archives of Singapore. April 26, 2007. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from Archives Online.
  10. “School Days - Brian Richmond”. Toggle. December 11, 2017. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from toggle.sg.
  11. Judith Helmberg. “Brian, grand-daddy of sports talk”. New Nation. July 20, 1981. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  12. Our City, Our Home: Eurasians 1965-2015. Singapore: Eurasian Association, 2015.
  13. Judith Helmberg. “Brian, grand-daddy of sports talk”. New Nation. July 20, 1981. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  14. Chan, Rachel. “Sing50: 70s Then and Now”. The Straits Times. May 21, 2015. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  15. Chan, Rachel. “Sing50: 70s Then and Now”. The Straits Times. May 21, 2015. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  16. Chan, Rachel. “Sing50: 70s Then and Now”. The Straits Times. May 21, 2015. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  17. Chan, Rachel. “Sing50: 70s Then and Now”. The Straits Times. May 21, 2015. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  18. Tan, Judith. “His No. 1 fan won’t be tuning in”. The New Paper. December 22, 2012. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  19. Tan, Judith. “His No. 1 fan won’t be tuning in”. The New Paper. December 22, 2012. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  20. Eddino Abdul Hadi. “Vets still rocking hard”. The Straits Times. May 29, 2009. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  21. Leong, Sandra. “Love is in the air”. The Straits Times. November 21, 2005. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  22. “Gold’s new slant”. The Straits Times. August 30, 2003. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  23. Arti Mulchand. “Putting her Faith in Twain”. The Straits Times. June 11, 2000. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  24. Lim, Rebecca. “One FM goes for news and gold”. The Straits Times. April 22, 1998. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  25. Lim, Rebecca. “One FM goes for news and gold”. The Straits Times. April 22, 1998. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  26. “Page 13 Miscellaneous Column 1”. New Paper. February 4, 1989. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  27. “Page 17 Miscellaneous Column 1”. New Paper. October 15, 1988. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  28. "Page 24 Miscellaneous Column 1”. New Paper. August 27, 1988. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  29. "Page 24 Miscellaneous Column 1”. New Paper. August 27, 1988. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG
  30. "Page 24 Miscellaneous Column 1”. New Paper. August 27, 1988. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  31. “Page 28 Miscellaneous Column 3”. New Paper. September 9, 1988. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  32. “Page 28 Miscellaneous Column 3”. New Paper. September 9, 1988. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  33. Lim, Rebecca. “Old pros - They are still top-draw DJs - Riding back on the block”. The Straits Times. April 22, 1998. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  34. Judith Helmberg. “Brian, grand-daddy of sports talk”. New Nation. July 20, 1981. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  35. Chan, Rachel. “Sing50: 70s Then and Now”. The Straits Times. May 21, 2015. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  36. Freeman, Bradley C and Yokanathan Ramakrishnan. “Singapore Radio: Then and Now”. April 26, 2016. Accessed 2 October 2019. Retrieved from Google Books.
  37. Long, Susan. “From father to son, Richmonds make their mark”. The Straits Times. September 28, 1997. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  38. Lim, Rebecca. “Old pros - They are still top-draw DJs - Riding back on the block”. The Straits Times. April 22, 1998. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  39. Chan, Rachel. “Sing50: 70s Then and Now”. The Straits Times. May 21, 2015. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  40. Lim, Rebecca. “Old pros - They are still top-draw DJs - Riding back on the block”. The Straits Times. April 22, 1998. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  41. Tan, Dylan. “Dialect shows and more for senior citizens’ arts festival”. The Business Times. August 4, 2017. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  42. Toh, Christopher. “The Good Old Days”. Today. November 2, 2015. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  43. Lydia Vasko. “Local talents bear fruit”. The Straits Times. October 5, 2012. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  44. Eddino Abdul Hadi. “Musical trip Down Memory Lane”. The Straits Times. October 4, 2012. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  45. Tan, Tara. “Shows naughty and nice”. The Straits Times. December 6, 2009. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  46. Toh, Christopher. “Old gold”. Today. September 11, 2009. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  47. Toh, Christopher. “Variety, the spice of life…” Today. June 4, 2009. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  48. Jeremy Sharma. “Blast with the past”. The Straits Times. July 28, 2008. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  49. Hooi, Joyce. “Gigs in memory of Michael”. The Straits Times. June 8, 2007. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  50. “5 things to do”. The Straits Times. August 14, 2005. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  51. Loh Keng Fatt. “Rolling back the years”. The Straits Times. October 1, 2004. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  52. Loh Keng Fatt. “Music of the heart”. The Straits Times. July 29, 2004. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  53. Loh Keng Fatt. “Rolling back the years”. The Straits Times. October 1, 2004. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  54. Wee, Tommy. “Retro-rock dinner show for charity”. The Straits Times. May 3, 2002. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  55. “Rock with Buddy”. The Straits Times. November 20, 2001. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  56. Arti Mulchand. “Charity gig to trip Down Memory Lane”. The Straits Times. August 28, 2000. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  57. Tong, Kelvin. “Are you lonesome tonight? Not anymore, say fans”. The Straits Times. August 18, 1997. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  58. “Eurasian stars help to raise funds for community”.  The Straits Times. October 5, 1993. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  59. “Live show at the Wishing Well this Saturday”. The Straits Times. May 31, 1990. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  60. Lim, Rebecca. “Old pros - They are still top-draw DJs - Riding back on the block”. The Straits Times. April 22, 1998. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  61. “Page 5 Miscellaneous Column 8”. The Straits Times. December 29, 1985. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  62. Lim, Rebecca. “Old pros - They are still top-draw DJs - Riding back on the block”. The Straits Times. April 22, 1998. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  63. Lim, Rebecca. “Old pros - They are still top-draw DJs - Riding back on the block”. The Straits Times. April 22, 1998. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  64. “President’s Star Charity show raises over $2.8m on Sunday”. Channel News Asia. September 12, 2004. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperS.
  65. Oon, Clarissa. “Arts for the heartlanders”. The Straits Times. July 31, 2001. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  66. Jill Alphonso. “Awards for Ong and Richmond”. The Straits Times. October 22, 2005. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  67. Tan Weizhen. “Radio celebrates 75 years with an eye on the future”. Today. July 27, 2011. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  68. Loh, Genevieve. “The winners”. Today. March 19, 2010. Accessed 1 October 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  69. Toh, Christopher. “A Soul Connection”. Today. December 1, 2007. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  70. Jill Alphonso. “Awards for Ong and Richmond”. The Straits Times. October 22, 2005. Accessed 30 September 2019. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.